The Charlie Bravo Story

Grace shall return

Dad here; in case you haven’t noticed by now, I tend to find inspiration in the oddest places. Charlie’s story is a prime example on this Easter Day. Although much has been made of Zach and I opening her crate, I would suggest that is infinitesimally microscopic in comparison to the sacrifice that Jesus made. His tomb did not open from the outside, but from the inside, and that is how He releases us from our crates; from the inside as well.

Traditional “preaching” has never really witnessed to me like it seems like it does to some others; I’m sure that’s a failing on my part, but we each learn our own way. There is great power in brevity; imagine what a world we would live in if we would all simply adhere to a few verses in Matthew 5?

Last night, I was reading the comments of Cody Jinks’ song “Cast No Stones” over on Youtube, where someone stated that there was too little grace in religion today. Cody himself responded with the statement, three simple words:

Grace shall return.

You may think that me finding that quote the night before Easter was coincidental, and there was a time that I would have agreed with you, but things have happened recently that have shaken my faith. The meaning of these words may mean something different to you than to me, based on either their context or where you are on your particular journey, but they have caused me to pause and reconsider my direction.

And that’s all Charlie and I hope to do with this page, focus on what unites us, not what differences divide us; there are more than enough people out there using fear to divide and conquer as it is, they sure don’t need any help from us.

So in honor of Easter Sunday, I would like to share a piece I found by Jack Riepe; Jack’s book “Conversations with a Motorcycle” was the inspiration to write Charlie’s book. He is known in motorcycle circles for his incredible writing, and his sarcasm and often profane wit mask a heart of gold, despite dealing with some physical issues. Here you go…

“He was an insignificant woodworker, who probably never owned more than one garment at a time. He spoke of peace and hope to multitudes who had neither. He taught us to share bread and fish. He washed the feet of mankind. He never wrote anything on his own behalf. He never traveled more than a couple of hundred miles in any direction. He was celebrated and reviled by the same crowd. He was betrayed by those he loved. Politics and circumstance brought him to judgement, and to the fulfillment of prophesy. His death was sought to maintain the status quo. Three days later, he cast aside the limitations of death and laid the cornerstone of western civilization.

It’s over two thousand years later, and half the world will kneel to this man throughout this weekend. All you have to do is wash somebody’s feet by giving them shoes… A loaf or a fish… And hope for another hour, a day, a week, or a year. Bring somebody back from despair this week.”

And there it is, folks; sound familiar? “As ye do unto the least of these, do ye even so to Me”…

Happy Easter from mom and dad and all the inmates at the Casa del Whackos!

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