ServiceThe Charlie Bravo Story

Physician, heal thyself

Dad here; for the last few months, life at the Casa has been “challenging”, for lack of a better term. Cares of life seem to cause words that usually flow easily to clog in my throat like ketchup in a full bottle; sure, the words are in there, but it takes a smack or two on the bottom to get them moving. Then I usually end up with much more on my plate than I initially planned.

It was on such a day that I was taking care of business at the DMV; the task at hand was costing me a good deal more than I had initially expected and as a result, I was in an exceptionally foul mood. Luckily, the Bryant office is one of the most efficient locations, so by the time my number was called, the crowd had thinned considerably. The clerk and I found ourselves belly aching about the bad news of the day, recent shootings, politicians, recent shootings at politicians (I made that one up), etc, when it occurred to me to stop in my tracks:

“Want to hear some good news for a change?”

I proceeded to tell her the story of Charlie Bravo and the message of the crate; the following is a message received from her yesterday, reposted here with her permission.

“Just wanted to comment I met dad at the revenue department where I work. He shared his story and brought me to tears. It is surely so wonderful to hear something good come out of something bad. Dad and his son are the true angels here. They saved Charlie bravo’s life and she saved their’s. I have shared the story with several several people over the last few days and all have said the same, angels are amongst us. My name is Lajena Holt. Thank you for sharing, dad!”

While this encounter didn’t positively affect my tax situation one iota, it did positively affect me, and hopefully some of the others that were eavesdropping on the conversation. I’m acutely aware that some were snickering, others probably wanting the short guy with the big mouth to finish conducting his business and move on, but sometimes you have to face the potential ridicule and “do what you gotta do”.

This compulsion is why I prefer to travel alone, as I consider Charlie not as a traveling companion but as an extension of me; becoming a parent of a rescue dog simply means that part of your heart is flouncing around on four legs outside your body.

So the next time you start getting hit with waves of negativity, take the to counter it with some positive; the life you save may be your own.

Chark diem!

Join the discussion

  1. Jan Davis

    Wonderful advice Dad, it is so easy to get caught up in all the bad things going on in this world, it is so much harder to focus on the good, but you definitely feel better when you don’t get no better than being a proud parent of rescued fur babies❤️❤️

  2. Carol Tedford

    I love Charlie’s story!! I was in the Bryant DMV on Wednesday and I agree they know their stuff and are pretty good. Accentuate the Positive!! Chark On, dad and and Charlie and the rest of the inmates at the Casa!!

  3. Robin Daniel

    Make it a great day Charlie Bravo

  4. Dianne Lane

    yuk! water is not clean!

  5. Kathy West

    Totally off topic, but I received my calendar. VEry good quality, Great pictures, highly suggest others get one….

  6. Rachel McGill

    Good job! making a difference in life. xx

  7. Kathy Moody

    I love the part about your heart flouncing on four legs. Couldn’t be truer.

  8. Becky Casper Wiltsee

    OMG.. it means part of your heart is flouncing around on four legs….Yes. I love this. It is my new favorite quote. I (we) are the proud parents of 5 rescue dogs and we have 2 bonded foster dogs in residence. My house is definitely an extension of your house.

  9. Jeanne Mancinelli

    Choosing to make the topic is awesome… choosing to share Charlie’s message… Priceless.

  10. Aimee Hahn

    “Part of your heart is flouncing around outside your body on 4 legs” Nailed it!! I’m missing part of my heart due to travel today and this just hit right what I feel, every time I see my rescue girl play with toys (took her 2 years to learn how), pounce a stick (no longer a scary weapon), or just be her goofy self with her dad (hated and feared men at first). Every time, there goes my heart.

    • Kathy West

      I had a dog once that was horribly abused. She feared a web leash and would cower under the bed whimpeing. She did not fear a chain leash. It took me several years to get her to not fear the leash. I would get so angry at whoever did this to Maggie. She was the best lab in the world. I wanted to find them and go after them….

    • Aimee Hahn

      That’s Daisy with flyswatters. Even after all these years, I can’t touch a flyswatter. I don’t even own one anymore. It made me cry the first time it happened, then I got really angry. Better that I never met the creatures that did that to her.

    • Kathy West

      Aimee Hahn I feel the same way. I cannot imagine hurting a dog or cat. I cry when I see these abuse stories and wish we could do something to the monster that hurts an animal’

    • Aimee Hahn

      Exactly right!! Every time Daisy jumps up and down on the bed, flops around like a beached fish looking for a belly rub, or gets all wiggly over a treat, I think “you go dog!! You keep being joy on legs, and I’ll keep watching and learning from you. “

  11. Raleen Riley Nichols

    I know how you feel! Been out of work for a while and this has been a really bad year financially. Savings are gone, hate to answer my phone because somebody demanding is on the other end. Then I think of my four legged ‘mob’ and look at the story of Charlie and other pets that have been saved and found loving homes. I also read the happy ending stories of people online and get a little hope generating again. Hope springs eternal. Blessings to you and yours this holiday season!

  12. Sandy Runyon Lough

    Oh, dad. You really found an especially profound and tender way to wrap it up…and put a bow on it. You enrich us all with your gifted expression. We’re beholden.

  13. Sam Howard

    I love the feed back your getting, “ye of one blood”.

  14. Maria Dawybida Minerley

    This is once again so timely! Thanks for the much needed chark! I love “becoming a parent of a rescue dog means that part of your heat is flouncing around on four legs outside your body.” I totally get that.

  15. Charlie Bravo - The Motorcycle Rescue Dog Story

    Maybe not as different from Biblical teaching as you might think; the law of sowing and reaping comes immediately to mind, though at times a bit harder to practice than it is to preach…

  16. Mark Moore

    Always positive in a world of negatives. I try to share your story with anyone who’ll listen, especially fellow dog lovers. Chark diem indeed!!!

  17. Yvonne Adams

    You are correct. But every time we can remember to replace a negative thought with a positive one we are making strides.

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